PodcastOne Sports Now talks with AP golf writer Doug Ferguson to get some perspective on the win, while co-hosts Tim Dahlberg and Jim Litke weigh in with the view other comebacks were more significant.

Tiger Woods thrilled the golf world by winning for the first time in five years, and immediately the talk on social media was it was the biggest sports comeback ever.

Woods delivered the perfect ending to his amazing return from back surgeries with a performance out of the past. He left the competition feeling hopeless as he built a five-shot lead early and then hung on for a 1-over 71 and a two-shot victory over Billy Horschel.

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It was the 80th victory of his PGA Tour, two short of the career record held by Sam Snead that is now very much in play. And it was his first victory in more than five years, dating to the 2013 Bridgestone Invitational.

And that brought a new version of Tigermania.

A year ago, there was no guarantee anyone would see much of Woods, much less Woods winning.

He’s back again. This victory, his first since the Bridgestone Invitational at Firestone in August 2013 — 1,876 days, to be exact — brought him to No. 13 in the world. Not bad for a 42-year-old with four back surgeries who returned to competition in December at No. 1,199 in the world.

The next stop for Woods is to board a plane with the rest of his U.S. teammates for France and the Ryder Cup.

Ferguson also previews the Ryder Cup for the podcast from his vantage point in Paris, where the U.S. has a stacked team that is favored by bookies to win the cup for a second straight time after years of European dominance. Ferguson says that while the U.S. has the talent to win big, Europe has the home field advantage and will have both the crowd and the emotion of the event on its side.

Is Tiger’s Win the Greatest Comeback Ever?